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Summon Bigger Fish(I mean, monster...)

22nd May 2014, 7:00 AM

Summon Bigger Fish(I mean, monster...)
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kidra on 22nd May 2014, 7:00 AM

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First of all, if you don't understand the title of this comic: TV Tropes is here for you

Second, for most characters an alignment change wouldn't be too big of a deal. But for certain classes (particularly Paladins, but also clerics), it can be disastrous. A cleric's alignment has to be within one step on the alignment scale of his/her deity, or risk losing their magical abilities.

So you can understand why Blake would want to avoid that.



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Clanjack Farlo on 22nd May 2014, 8:17 AM

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I am an avid Dungeons & Dragons player, and quite honestly, this is one of the most refreshing comics out there for geeks like me. Keep up the great work!

Thanks

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kidra on 22nd May 2014, 8:26 AM

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Thanks! We do our best to make it good.

Alignment change!

SeriousBiz on 22nd May 2014, 10:18 AM

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One of the more compelling characters I've had was a cleric who started out as lawful neutral. The no-nonsense, zealous, sin-punishing type who was fiercely loyal to his church. Sort of an inquisitor type, but without all the torture. He preferred a heavy mace to soft cushions in any case.

One of his companions in the party turned out to be a young chaotic good elf rogue. The cleric took it upon himself to educate the girl in combat (her player valued sneaky skills more than combat) while she taught him to see value in all living beings, from the lowliest worm to the mightiest god. We got some very good character development from that dynamic.

Ultimately, the cleric had a change of heart, and started protecting life for its own sake, instead of out of some dogma he had absorbed. After almost getting himself killed while allowing his injured party and a group of gnome prisoners escape from the undead guards of the Dungeons of Vecna, the DM ruled that my character had broken the alignment rules too many times, and would henceforth belong to the lawful good alignment.

Fortunately, my cleric happened to worship Saint Cuthbert, who really didn't mind since we played him as lawful good with lawful neutral tendencies (for those who don't know, Saint Cuthbert is a deity originally from the Greyhawk campaign setting, who alternates between being lawful neutral and lawful good depending on the edition).

Don't know how often your average sociopathic D&D adventurer is in danger of changing alignment to good instead of evil, but there you go.

Allignment Shift

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mistriousfrog on 22nd May 2014, 10:39 AM

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It is a bad GM who holds alignment over players like some kind of stick to beat them over the head with if they step out of line. Don't get me wrong, sticking to your alignment is important and all, but nothing sours a player more than being told that if they don't save this orphan from the dragon which is clearly too high a level for them and is basically a suicide mission, they will lose all their paladin traits.

On the other hand, if done right, an alignment shift can be an incredible moment and very fun dramatically. Paladins especially since they rely on alignment so much. The Powder Keg of Justice is still an iconic D&D story for me in that regard and a shining example of how it should be dramatic rather than mechanical when alignment changes.

Here is a link to the Powder Keg of Justice for those who don't know it:
http://1d4chan.org/wiki/Powder_Keg_of_Justice

Powder Keg

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kidra on 22nd May 2014, 11:21 AM

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Holy Crap that's link is one of the best examples of role-playing I've ever heard.

While for the most part I believe in rolling for stuff like intimidate, but with role-playing that intense and beautiful, I'd be inclined to just GM-rule that the intimidate was successful.

RP bonuses

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mistriousfrog on 22nd May 2014, 6:01 PM

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I agree. I still like to roll just so there is still a potential for failure due to perhaps factors beyond the character's control, but especially in regards to roleplaying I offer large circumstance bonuses based on what players say.

Disloyal Subject on 30th May 2014, 12:53 AM

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A link to TVTropes? I'll skip the "No, you fool, you've doomed us all!" and express my mild surprise that you didn't just link the Trope Named directly, what with it being a campaign comic and all. Regarding alignment... Let's just say my party and I agreed to disagree. I was the NG treehugging orc healer (houserule: no racial stat modifiers for PCs) who through a combination of lucky dice and roleplay effectively had a Barbarian's Rage (when my character was pissed, my rolls gibbed my foes) and who, despite bloodlust and pragmatism, was extremely compassionate, kind, and reasonable. The Lawful Goods were murderhobos. Once their back story came out, it made sense - we were all decent roleplayers - but still, when the orc, hippie or not, is the one in favor of sparing lives, something's wrong.
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